Have You Reached "Enoughable?"

This Week's Simple Tip: The English language is filled with words that have contradictory meanings, depending on their context.

For example: 1) Custom: A common practice or a specifically made item; 2) Finished: Completed or destroyed; and 3) Consult:To give advice or to get advice. The word "weak" is another tricky one. People can be referred to as "weak," because of the things they do or the decisions they make. But often perceived weaknesses have nothing to do with our personal choices. Take for instance letting things go and giving up. It really takes a great deal of strength to let go of things.

Given the non-stop pace of life anymore, perhaps we could all benefit if we looked at giving up some things as being strong instead or weak. What sense does it make to hang onto things until we drive them (or ourselves) into the ground? I recently read an article about "enoughable" things, defined as something that is "stopped or limited because it’s enough, even when there’s room or reason for more." The author spoke of how she "admired people who recognize and embrace "enoughable." While they had lived in a manner that suited them, they then declared enough. They could have kept pushing forward but they did not. They don’t care what other people think "makes sense" or what they might miss. It’s like they breathe a contented sigh and move forward in peace and freedom." What "enoughable" thing(s) can you let go of for more serenity?

This Week's Focus:

This week, look at the things in your life that are potentially "enoughable" — careers, nest eggs, living spaces, budgets, schedules, kids' activities, food servings, business revenue. While more seems to be the default, what can you truly give up? Click on the serenity sticky to print, cut and post on your bathroom mirror to remind you of this week's focus. Good luck!

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